Margaret Finegan
Phone: 312 261 0077
Mobile: 773 502 1673
Toll Free: 7735021673
Pager: 7735021673
Fax: 7735021673
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  Keller Wiliiams Luxury Home Real Estate Specialist

Andersonville's roots as a community extend well back into the 19th century, when immigrant Swedish farmers started moving north into what was then a distant suburb of Chicago. In the 1850's the area north of Foster and east of Clark was a large cherry orchard, and families had only begun to move into the fringes of what is now Andersonville. The neighborhood's first school, the Andersonville School, was built in 1854 at the corner of those two thoroughfares, and served as the area's primary school until 1908.

Today, in addition to being one of the most concentrated areas of Swedish culture in the United States, Andersonville is home to a diverse assortment of devoted residents and businesses, including one of Chicago's largest gay and lesbian communities, a large collection of Middle Eastern restaurants and bakeries, and a thriving Hispanic commercial area north of Catalpa Avenue.

Andersonville is now considered one of Chicago's "hot" neighborhoods. It also enjoys nationwide renown for its unique commercial district, comprised almost entirely of locally owned, independent businesses. In 2004, an economic study of Andersonville was reported in newspapers across the globe. It demonstrated what Andersonville locals haev known for a long time: that the locally owned businesses are a crucial part of Andersonville's vitality and quality of life, returning far more to the community in economic benefits and neighborhood involvement than would non-local businesses. Communities everywhere now look to emulate Andersonville as a model of a thriving urban neighborhood.

In the late 1980's, Andersonville began a period of revival as professionals rediscovered its lovely housing stock and proximity to downtown Chicago and the lakefront. A large lesbian and gay population developed, spurred by the opening of such businesses as Women & Children First, a bookstore focusing on feminist authors and topics. New gift shops and ethnic eateries opened up and gave Clark Street a new commercial vitality and diversity.